NZXT Rogue Small Form Factor Computer Case

Closer Look on the Rogue

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Opening the front panel, we find access to two 5.25” drive bays and the one floppy drive/3.5” drive bay, which are fewer than many cases. However, most of my computers only use one or two bays at most, so this likely won’t be a problem for the average user. . Along with the power and reset button, the right of the front panel contains two USB ports, and eSATA port, and a microphone/headphone jack. Another nifty feature is the lockable front door which is an added security feature for those shady LAN parties.
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Turning the case to the sides, the first thing to note are the two 120mm fan ports on the left and right of the case, which is a good amount of cooling for such a small case. The Rogue comes with two 120mm fans on the sides which should provide more than adequate circulation for such a small space.
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Looking at the back of the case, we see another 120mm fan preinstalled and the standard set of slots for PCI cards and the motherboard I/O ports. As you might be able to tell from the picture, both the motherboard and power supply brackets are removable. This is a nice feature especially for a small case that might offer limited room inside. However, as we’ll see, the removable motherboard bracket does present some problems as well.
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Opening up the case first involves unscrewing a single screw holding the top in place, then removing the top. Once the case is open, we get a better view of the layout of the case. As you can see, this isn’t an ordinary case, with the drive bays suspended over the motherboard. There are 4 additional 3.5 drive bays inside the case to house hard drives.
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The case also comes with a healthy amount of screws and a nice carrying strap for the case. I really like how NZXT takes the time to label the accessories; most companies simply throw them all into a single bag.
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Sure, a computer case might look good, but the real test comes when putting in components. Unfortunately, this is where I think the NZXT Rogue falls a little short. On the good side, I really like the removable motherboard bracket; this makes building a computer very easy. However, for some reason, not all of the component I installed onto it lined up correctly; for example, the PCI cards weren’t lining up with the holes on the bracket. This might not be entirely the cases’ fault, as the tolerance buildup might be a factor.
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The next frustrating step came when I tried to reinstall the motherboard bracket back into the case; when I did so, I found that the CPU cooler I was using (the Evercool Transformer) interfered with the case itself, preventing me from reinstalling the bracket. So I had to go and remove the cooler and find another one that fit; I had to dig deep to find one that actually worked, only because I was able to remove the cooler fan. I would have liked NZXT to have designed a removable bracket that would have allowed larger CPU coolers to fit.

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